Lake District National Trust

Lake District National Trust

Lake District National Trust

Lake District National Trust


The National Trust in the Lake District and Cumbria is the most important single organisation protecting and preserving the natural beauty of the Lake District and surrounding areas.

Currently in the hands of the National Trust there are over 248,000 hectares or if you are like me 612,000 acres of countryside, over 300 historic buildings, plus gardens which offer a range of visitor facilities, including car parking, restaurants and shops, whilst not forgetting 600 miles of coastline.

One of the great co-founders of the National Trust was Canon Hardwicke Rawnsley, who lived in the Lake District and became its first secretary (Castlerigg Stone Circle was purchased by Canon Hardwicke Rawsley in 1913 for the National Trust) along with co-founders Miss Octavia Hill and Sir Robert Hunter in 1895. The first property of this kind was Brandelhow Park, on the shores of Derwent Water.

Lake District National Trust

Should you be out walking or hiking within the Lake District there is a good possibility you will be on National Trust land, as around one quarter of the Lake District National Park, which includes over 36,000 hectares (90,000 acres). The National Trust also owns Buttermere, Crummock Water, Loweswater, and large sections of Derwent Water, Ullswater and Rydal. Wast Water, another trust owned lake is also the deepest lake, with the mountains of Scafell Pike being the highest in England, Great Gable, the Langdales, and Great Mell Fell are also in their trust.

Camping in the Lake District.

With the National Trust owning so much land within the Lake District, there is also the great opportunity of camping out on the Trusts designated camp sites such as Low Wray, Wasdale and Great Langdale and you can easily check for availability and bookings on the National Trust website.

Some of the most popular Lake District properties are;

Beatrix Potter Gallery, located at Hawkshead.

Fell Foot Park, located at Windermere.

Hill Top (home of Beatrix Potter, where many of her famous books where written) Near Sawrey.

Steam Gondola, located at Coniston Water.

Sizergh Castle, located near Kendal.

Stagshaw Gardens, a woodland garden, created by Cubby Acland, with some delightful walks and access to the nearby fells.

Townend, located at Troutbeck, which is a great place to visit with a wealth of family history.

Wordsworth’s House, located at Cockermouth.

Support the Lake District National Trust

The Lake District National Trust is a registered charity and rely on the generosity of its members and supporters. Family memberships are availably whilst this then allows free admission into all its properties, along with other benefits. Supporting the trust and being a member, you are helping to protect our heritage and saving the landscape for generations to come.

Five million pounds needs to be raised to repair 145 footpaths in the Lake District, visit Fix The Fells to find out more and make a donation. This initiative is supported by the National Trust, Lake District National Park, Nature Lakeland and Natural England to name but a few.

Please support the Lake District National Trust.

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle

One has to wonder who built, and for what purpose Castlerigg Stone Circle, located within a short distance of Keswick, whilst believed to have been built around 3000 BC at the beginning of the Neolithic Period. Castlerigg is also one of the earliest stone circles in Britain, spectacularly situated a top of the plateau of Castlerigg Fell, within a panorama of rugged hills and fells of ever changing character, depending on the ever changing Lakeland weather and seasons.

Although the circles origins are unknown it is believed that it was used for ceremonial or religious purposes, whilst it is important in terms of megalithic astronomy and geometry, as the construction contains significant astronomical alignments.

Castlerigg Stone Circle consists of 38 stones of variable size and shape, whilst they are all un-hewn boulders, and natural in formation. Some of the stones stand over 5 in height, although some have fallen since the circles erection over the last 5,000 years. Just inside the eastern end of the circle is a group of 10 stones forming a rectangular enclosure known as a cove, the purpose of which is unknown. The circle is 32.6 metres at its widest and the heaviest stone has been estimated to weigh 16 tons.

Castlerigg Stone Circle was bought in 1913 by Cannon Hardwicke Rawnsley, who was a co-founder of the National Trust, and the stone circle is on land owned by the National Trust, whilst maintained by English Heritage.

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Excavations within the cove, in 1882 provided very little in the way of archaeological finds, although quantities of charcoal where discovered. There is a wide space to the northern end of the circle, framed by two large stones, which may have served as an entrance. A stone axe head was found on the site in 1875.

On a more mysterious level Castlerigg Stone Circle has been the focus of one well-recorded sighting in 1919 by a man called T Singleton and his friend, of mysterious and strange light phenomena, as they watched white light balls moving slowly over the stones. Strange light themes are a recurring oddity to ancient sites throughout the world, and this may have been one of the reasons for the construction of such monuments at specific locations.

On a clear day you will be rewarded with spectacular rugged Lakeland panoramic views from Castlerigg Stone Circle, with some of the highest peaks in Cumbria, the mountains of Hellvellyn, Latrigg, Skiddaw, Grassmoor and Blencathra. The plateau of Castlerigg being surrounded by such peaks creates a natural amphitheatre with the raised Castlerigg Stone Circle at the centre.

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Sitting within the stone circle on a summer’s solstice as the sun rises, surrounded by the power, beauty and authority of Mother Nature it is hard not to be in wonder at the original magnitude and real purpose of the circle. I am no historian, although 5,000 years ago where we not still hunter gatherers? Here at Castlerigg Stone Circle moving anything up to 16 ton of rugged stones about would be an arduous task today, so imagine why you would have even considered stepping out of your rural dwelling of 5,000 years ago without any of life’s modern luxuries to construct such a lasting monument as Castlerigg Stone Circle, when surely survival would have been top of my priority list.

Should you wish to see better quality photographs of this walk please visit Castlerigg Stone Circle on our Lake District Walks Flickr account.

I hope you enjoy your visit to Castlerigg Stone Circle.

Go Ape

Go Ape Whinlatter Cumbria

Go Ape Whinlatter Cumbria

Go Ape In Cumbria

There are 2 Go Ape destinations within the Lake District National park. These being Go Ape at Grizedale Forest, and Go Ape at Whinlatter Forest Park. Both are award winning hire wire forest adventure courses of extreme rope bridges, Tarzan like swings and zip slides, up to 40 feet up. You can climb the trees and slide across rope bridges and zip wires high above the ground.

Go Ape provides a great fun day experience, with friends, family and colleagues. For safety you will be kitted out with climbing harnesses and all you need to enjoy this great facility without injury. You and your group will be given first hand expert instruction in the do’s and don’ts before trekking off of to enjoy the high level fun above the forest floor.

Go Ape In Cumbria

Whinlatter Forest Park is England’s only true mountain forest, rising to 790 metres above sea level, offering spectacular views of the Lake District and into Scotland. Whinlatter is also the highest Go Ape in the country at 360 metres above sea level.

Go Ape Appropriate Clothing.

Appropriate clothing should be used whilst at Go Ape, sturdy walking boots, warm clothing and waterproofs to keep the rain out. Depending on the time of year no harm is done, filling the flask for your return to the car and a well enjoyed hot drink. Do check with Go Ape for their full advised clothing list.

Height Requirements.

Here in the Lake District Go Ape at Grizedale Forest and Whinlatter are very popular tourist attractions for people of all ages, however for safety reasons there are restrictions.

Height 1m 40cm / 4feet 7 inches

Minimum age 10 years

Maximum weight 20.5 stones

Supervising children, under 18’s must be accompanied by a participating responsible adult.

For more information and bookings

Whinlatter Go Ape telephone 0845 643 9215

For more information on Go Ape please follow the link Go Ape

I hope that this article has been helpful and should you visit either of the Go Ape Lake District attractions that you have a great time and lots of fun.

Go Ape In Cumbria

Whilst holidaying in the Lake District Go Ape is a great fun day out to enjoy.

Cottages Keswick

Cottages Keswick

Cottages Keswick

Cottages Keswick

The bustling market town of Keswick, set amongst the mountains and between 2 lakes, is thought by some to be the capitol of the Lake District, and rightly so as it is the hub of all things Lakeland, whilst attracting a great many visitors all year round. Keswick has many shops and a cosmopolitan feel about it with numerous restaurants, café bars and country pubs, which have a great allure when the weather turns wet as often happens in the Lake District, preventing you from venturing onto the local fells. Why not relax in a pleasant tea room and mull over your next route or walk?

Cottages Keswick, self-catering accommodation comes in all discerning categories including, converted barns, farmhouses, apartments, cottages, bungalows, family houses and large houses set within their own grounds. Notwithstanding the beautiful locations, from town centre Keswick, peaceful village to remote Lakeland valley.

With such a large variety of cottages in and around Keswick, there is without doubt something to meet everyone’s personal and unique tastes. With this in mind you should easily be able to find cottages in Keswick which meet you budget and needs. Finding the appropriate self-catering cottages for your needs can save you money as cottages do come in all shapes and sizes, with different facilities and grading’s, locations and situations.

Cottages Keswick

Cottages Keswick

Cottages Keswick

It is a popular belief that booking last minute will yield a bargain, although that myth I will dispel for you now as quality matters in today’s market, and all the great “cottages Keswick” will have been booked months in advance. If you want quality do your research and book early so not to be disappointed.

Should you intend to bring man’s best friend along to enjoy the fresh air and walks you will find most cottages Keswick are pet friendly, permitting dogs, although it is worth checking when you book. Most public houses will also permit dogs in the main bar areas, although once again it’s simply easier to ask first.

What Does Keswick have to Offer?

Keswick boast an array of many attractions, for tourists and walkers alike. You may walk many of the local peaks such as Skiddaw, Latrigg, Cat Bells and Helvelyn, ramble through Borrowdale and for a family walk, suitable for buggies, try the old railway path from Keswick to Threlkeld. For something different, why not visit the impressive prehistoric monument of Castlerigg Stone Circle on the plateau of Castlerigg fell. For warm summer days take a picnic, sit on the banks of Derwentwater or Bassenthwaite Lake.

Should mountain biking be your pleasure, there are many cycle routes plus there are the specifically built trails on Whinlatter Pass, just above Keswick, where you can hire bikes.

Cottages Keswick

Cottages Keswick

Cottages Keswick

Places to visit also include;

Go Ape

Theatre by the Lake

Pencil Museum

Honister Slate museum

Keswick Launch

The shops of Keswick sell everything (all your outdoor needs are covered with an abundance of outdoor shops) from antiques, books, paintings, pottery, jewellery, speciality foods and local produce, as well as clothes, gifts and traditional toys.

There is the Keswick weekly market on Saturdays which sells some great local Lake District produce.

Well that about sums it up for Cottages Keswick and I hope this article has been informative and helpful to you in planning your next short break or holiday to the Keswick area. Feel free to make any comments and or suggestions below and please share with your friends.

There is an abundance of holiday accommodation within Keswick and the surrounding area, with Campsites near Castlerigg Stone Circle, Guest Houses, Hotels and local pubs. For a pet friendly home search our Lake District Cottages for a local cottage in Keswick or the surrounding area.

All Cottages Keswick pictures supplied by Cumbrian Cottages.

Keswick Walks

Sunset From Latrigg, Keswick & Derwentwater

Sunset From Latrigg, Keswick & Derwentwater

Keswick Walks

Keswick is regarded by some as the capital of the Lake District and as such is the base for many weekend breaks, walking holidays and simple get away from it all relaxing breaks.

There is an endless combination of Keswick walks around the town and surrounding area, suitable for all ages and abilities, which are easily accessible such as, Derwentwater and Borrowdale. Walkers may choose from gentle strolls to full day’s mountain hiking, with many in between.

A few of my personal favourites include Latrigg, Walla Crag, Castlerigg Stone circle and the walking and cycling Railway path. This combination of Keswick walks offers something for everyone.

The Keswick Walks Railway Path

The Keswick Railway path is a purpose built path which offers a relatively even and flat nature walk. The route follows the valley bottom of the river Greta heading out of Keswick towards the Lakeland village of Threlkeld and the well-known Lake District mountain of Blencathra. It is hard to get lost on the Railway path and is simply a case of following the path, making this a good family walk, with children and dogs. This walks path is buggy friendly, whilst suitable for wheelchair users at the Keswick side, and runs approximately 4 miles in total. Once you have walked as far as you desire, simply retrace your steps and amble back enjoying the fauna and flora of this Keswick walks.

Friers Crag / Around Derwentwater

This is one of the great local short level walks, suitable for children and prams, whilst suitable for the disabled, with great views of Derwentwater and surrounding fells. Starting with your back to the Keswick Information Centre, take the right hand exit into Lake Road and continue for approximately 150 metres. Take the paved road which is still Lake Road down to the right under the subway. On leaving the subway continue ahead with Hope Park on your right. Bear right past the wishing well and go past the Theatre on your left. As you arrive at the lake continue ahead onto the gravel track to Friers Crag. This particular one of our Keswick walks is approximately 4 miles and with little or no climb and should take about 1.5 hours to complete.

Keswick Walks Latrigg

Of all the local Keswick walks Latrigg is a good moderate walk which will push your level of fitness and therefore be a good indicator before you try any of the more impressive Lakeland fells and mountains. The Latrigg walks are generally circular by nature starting at Fitz Park and on up Spooney Lane across woodlands and fields. Then following the footpath to the summit and an amazing viewpoint of the surrounding area. This particular Keswick walks is approximately 6 miles and climbs about 1,000 feet and should take about 3 hours to complete.

Keswick Walks Sunset

Keswick Walks Sunset

Keswick is most definitely well situated for any walking trip or holiday, being centrally located within the Northern Lake District, exploring this area of outstanding natural beauty, with exceptional Lakeland views from such destinations as Skiddaw, Blencathra, the Helvellyn Range and the Borrowdale fells all within walking distance or a short, car bus or launch ride away. At this point I believe it is worth mentioning the Ullswater launch as this is a marvellous way to access the Helvellyn range and Striding Edge walks, although it is great do complete a day’s walking being car free where ever possible.

Equipment

For any day out enjoying our local Keswick walks it is always advisable to go well prepared and with good gear. This is the secret of enjoying walking anywhere, and all types of walks. Don’t compromise on your own comfort and safety for the sake of a cheap or rushed purchase, as it’s simply not worth it in the long run. Remember quality lasts long after the price is forgotten. Being safe, warm and dry, remembering this is the Lake District after all and it does rain.

Keswick History.

The valleys and surrounding area of Keswick has a strong history of copper and slate production, with Honister slate mine and the Threlkeld quarry worth a visit.

Perhaps one of the most famous discoveries, was that of graphite in Borrowdale around 1550. Derwent pencils are renowned for their quality and the Pencil Museum in Keswick will lead you through how they lay claim to the world’s first graphite pencil.

Whatever Keswick walks you ultimately embark on I hope you enjoy.

Coast To Coast Cycling

Coast To Coast Cycling

Coast To Coast Cycling

Coast to Coast Cycling

 

Similar to Wainwright’s Coast to Coast walk the equivalent for long distance cyclists is the Sea to Sea or C2C as it is better known. Coast to coast cycling offers some of the most spectacular scenery in Great Britain. This is the UK’s most popular cycle route and is approximately 140 miles long.

The coast to coast cycling route is very similar to the walking route in so much as it starts at the Irish Sea at St Bees on the Cumbrian coast, the route crosses the Lakeland fells, the Eden Valley, the Pennines, the Yorkshire Dales, the Cleveland Hills, and finally the North Yorkshire Moors before reaching Robin Hood’s Bay on the East Coast. On route you will pass through three contrasting National Parks and some of England’s finest scenery.

Coast To Coast Cycling

Unlike Wainwright’s coast to coast there are several variations of start and finishing points when cycling with both Workington and Whitehaven being popular starting points, whilst Tynemouth and Sunderland are also considered great finishing points.

Dependent upon the route you choose this may include Black Hill, the highest point on the National Cycle Network at 609 meters.

Whichever route you ultimately decide upon when you get your map out and considering who may be accompanying you it is always advisable to choice a route that is within your capabilities.

The route is covered by the National Cycle Network map number seven, and this map is essential for the ride as the route makes use of regular roads, bridleways, old railways etc and, as such, is not a single waymarked cycle track. Therefore good map reading within any group is an advantage.

Coast To Coast Cycling Route

On average a moderately fit person will complete the coast to coast cycling route in three days of cycling, which is enough to be a challenge and can be completed in a long weekend. If on the other hand you have more time it is a great way to enjoy the unspoilt villages and hamlets you will pass through on your route.

For those who enjoy mountain biking there are additional routes you could take in for great off-road riding.

Should you wish for some additional support there are companies who will assist you or your group and this can be very helpful for health and safety reasons, not withstanding puncture repairs, directions and any other problems that may arise.

Coast to coast cycling is great fun so enjoy and if you have any great experiences please send them in to me.

Pooley Bridge Walks

Pooley Bridge Walks

The Dacre Bears

Pooley Bridge Walks

Lunch And Just Desert.

There are many circular and triangular walks in the world although not as many which are short, yet long enough to work up an appetite, and with such excellent all round benefits as the one I am about to tell you of.

This particular Pooley Bridge walks I have called Lunch and Just Desert with good reason. It’s quite simple! I love my deserts and I enjoy being a little naughty as I am sure we all do? Therefore the title of this walk is a little play on words and will unfold some more as you read on.

This Pooley Bridge walks is between the Lakeland village of Dacre, which is situated not too far from Penrith and Pooley Bridge, and the stately home of Dalemain, which is open to visitors (but do check on opening times!).

There is both parking in the village hall car park of Dacre or near to the 18th Century Horse and Farrier Inn at Dacre to one end of the walk, or parking within the grounds of Dalemain at the other end of the walk.

Pooley Bridge Walks

Dacre Castle

I would suggest a good time to do this walk would be when both the above establishments are open as this definitely makes the walk more rewarding to all, including the little people.

The Pooley Bridge walks is between the historic village of Dacre and its medieval Church and peel tower type castle and Dalemain. Depending on your view point one can start from which ever end you desire although I would recommend parking at Dalemain and commencing the walk from there.

Once parked up at Dalemain in the visitors parking you will see towards the right of a stone building is a road with cattle grid and this you need to aim for and follow the road towards the courtyard of Dalemain. Keeping to your right you will pass an old gamekeepers lodge on your right as the road opens up into the courtyard.

Pooley Bridge Walks

The Village Green

Pooley Bridge Walks

To the right there is visible a stonewall of maybe 10 feet in height and I might suggest this to be possibly a walled garden on the other side. Following the tall stonewall and keeping it to your left follows the single-track all the way towards Dacre.

This is then a very simple walk with just a few gentle slopes of very little incline and I would say it is a good walk for all and of all ages. No great skill is needed in following the track road as it just opens out in front of you.

There are sheep about in the fields so keeping dogs on a lead is advisable.

Once you get near to the end of the pathway keep an eye to your left for the Peel tower castle of Dacre, which has a history all of its own. As you pass the tower on your left if you look to your right you should see St Andrews Church and believe it or not; Dacre has had a church for over a 1,000 years !

Pooley Bridge Walks

Within the grounds of the Church you can see the old and famous Dacre Bears and you may visit this website link to find out more; http://www.visitcumbria.com/pen/chp1.htm or

http://www.english-lakes.com/dacre.htm

The church is well worth a visit.

Keeping to the path and passing the tower you will come to a T junction and if you turn right you will see a short distance in front of you the old 18th Century Inn, the Horse and Farrier.

Pooley Bridge Walks

18th Century Horse And Farrier, Dacre

On entering the public house I would recommend if you get your timing just right that this would be a grand time for a spot of Lunch after a brisk walk from Dalemain. For a reasonable price I would go for lunch here and a sample of the cask ales, obviously just going for the main course.

All good reasoning would then justify after all this exercise and precision timing that it would be possible to make it all the way back to the exquisite old tea room at Dalemain for Just Desert and coffee !!

What more can one ask of a good walk? Fresh air, exercise, beautiful Lakeland scenery and wholesome food to boot!!

This is a great Pooley Bridge walks and being a circular route is great for parking your car any where upon the route.

Great Mell Fell Walk

Great Mell Fell Walk

Great Mell Fell Walk

Great Mell Fell Walk

Do you like a walk of untold mystery that makes you wonder who or what was here before us? How old is civilisation itself? How different are we to those who long ago walked these same hills?

Look to the heavens on a clear night here in the Lake District and you could be looking upon the same stars as someone did some 1,000 years ago.

Not too distant from the village of Dacre is the stone circle of Castlerigg not more than some 9 miles away and throughout the whole area is a wealth of tumuli, barrows, mounds and stone circles all of great antiquity, and not forgetting the strange stone Dacre Bears.

This walk is going to take us from Dacre to the summit of Great Mell Fell just of the road A5091 and back.

Great Mell Fell will be visible for most of the walk so we will start with some history and it is for you the reader to decide on fact or fiction?

Is Great Mell Fell an early pyramid built at the dawn of time and before history began ? There are some who consider this to be fact ! The question is, should Great Mell Fell be considered in the same context as Silbury Hill in Wiltshire to be some kind of earth mound ? Or is it just an uncanny resemblance with Silbury Hill ? Great Mell Fell is taller than the great pyramid of Giza. Great Mell Fell elevation is 537 m (1762ft)

An ancient tumulus or gravesite was discovered close to its summit and the area is full of Neolithic sites.

So whilst walking this easy to medium walk you may ponder the simple existence of Great Mell Fell, is it simply a fell or is it some strange ancient burial site ?

Leaving the village of Dacre and heading down the road towards the settlement of Sparket. Keep looking out for a sign on the right hand side for Hesket Farm and leaving the road firstly follow the farm road until you see on your left just before the farm a public footpath sign and follow this.

Great Mell Fell Walk

This path bends to the right around the farm buildings and heads across the fields and down towards a small wooded copse and you will be looking for a bridge that cross the stream which is flowing towards Dacre beck.

Panoramic View From Summit

Panoramic View From Summit

Reaching the farm road you turn right and follow the track all the way through the Hesket farm and aim for Sparket Mill. On reaching Sparket mill if you are lucky you might see the peacock that lives locally.

For approximately 30 minutes follow the Thackthwaite road until you have passed through the settlement of Thackthwaite and look out for a public footpath on your right. It is a little misleading at first as it does start as a very rough pathway of the road, which after approximately 10 meters bends out of sight to the right.

Following this public footpath across the fields you are heading towards 1 large barn and house in the valley below although this cannot be seen. Coming to the barn the style was broken and lying in the field as of 20.02.10.

On seeing the 2 Dacre Beck bridges take the one to the left and look on the left hand side for the public footpath that follows the edge of the Beck. You are then aiming roughly for the right hand side of the large farm of Walloway.

On reaching the road turn left and keep walking with Great Mell Fell now to your right. Keep walking along the road until you reach the first road / rough path on the left and taking this you will start to rise upwards. Looking for the second gate and taking this you will see the main footpath, which will take you all the way to the summit of Great Mell Fell. There are some amazing old wind thrashed trees on the fell and keep your eyes open for the wild life on the fell.

On reaching the summit after several false thoughts of having reached the top you will be rewarded with some fantastic far-reaching panoramic view of the Lake District and the Pennines.

Whilst having reached the top of Great Mell Fell it is only now that you will realise how curved and possibly tomb like it really is. Yes I agree it is not perfectly curved but then it was possibly made some 2,000 plus !! Food for thought as you walk home !!

Great Mell Fell Walk

Returning via the route up Great Mell Fell and returning to the road you now have a choice of routes. Firstly you can simply turn left and follow the road all the way back to your car at Dacre using Ordnance Survey map 90 or you can turn right along the road and look for the public footpath on the left which takes you across the fields towards Grenrow and on reaching Greenrow turn left and follow the road back to Dacre depending on your time scale and fitness levels?

This walk is good for families with children, dogs and individuals of all levels with reasonable fitness levels.

Please remember to keep dogs on a lead whilst on farm land although these roads are quiet and with a reasonably well behaved dog you might enjoy letting your dog of the lead whilst on the road, although this is entirely at your own risk and within your own responsibility.

I hope you enjoy your Great Mell Fell Walk.

Paragliding In The Lake District

Blencathra Paragliding

Blencathra Paragliding

Paragliding In The Lake District

Paragliding in the Lake District is a recreational and competitive sport. A paraglider is a free flying, foot launched aircraft, with the pilot sitting suspended by a harness below a fabric wing, developed from parachuting canopies, whose shape is formed by its suspension lines and the pressure of air entering the front of the canopy.

Modern paragliding canopies can be flown effortlessly on windward slopes of Lakeland fells, and flown across country in good conditions. It is very similar to the freedom experienced by a hang glider, although a paraglider is more portable and easier to learn to fly. They can be seriously hampered by strong winds yet easily landed in a field.

Paragliding In The Lake District

Blencathra Paragliding Looking To Derwent Water

Blencathra Paragliding Looking To Derwent Water

With modern technologies and manufacture costs reducing, paragliding has become a thriving sport with average cost of equipment at about £2,000. The countrywide BHPA offers lots of flying sites and a great supportive flying and social network.

On a spring or summers day with blue skies and fluffy white clouds usually signifies abundant yet invisible lifting air currents, which paragliding pilots use to gain altitude. On such days you will see easy take off’s from the hills and fells of the Lake District as a pilot prepares himself for take off and a sometimes simple run and the wind does the rest.

Once in the air it is possible to travel to a pre selected goal or simply drift on the air currents where they take you and this can be a very exhilarating experience as you take in the beautiful scenery as it unfolds beneath you.

Flights of over 150 km have been recorded in this country.

Paragliding

Paragliding

Paragliding In The Lake District

On my most recent walk up Blencathra on the 9th April, which was a beautiful sunny day the paragliders where out in force and here are a few pictures, which I took.

If your are interested in Paragliding in the Lake District there are several club and establishments where you can learn and on average this takes about 2 weeks.

If you do decide Paragliding in the Lake District is for you enjoy and always remember the common sense approach to safety for all outdoor activities.

Coast To Coast Walk

Coast To Coast Walk

Coast To Coast Walk

Coast To Coast Walk

By now your probably wondering what all the fuss is about with this so called Coast to Coast walk?

Let me try my best to now explain what all the hullabaloo is about and it starts with one of the Lake Districts most recognisable charismatic characters as the Coast to Coast walk was the brain child of Alfred Wainwright, the well known writer and hill walker. It is often referred to as Wainwright’s Coast to Coast Walk or even Wainwright’s Way. Wainwright him self recommends you dip their booted feet in the Irish Sea at St Bees, and at the end, dip their naked feet in the North Sea at Robin Hood’s Bay.

Coast To Coast Walk

The Coast to Coast Walk crosses three of our contrasting National Parks and undoubtedly some of England’s finest scenery including;

The Lake District National Park

The Yorkshire Dales National Park

The North York Moors National Park

The walk starts besides the Irish Sea at St Bees on the Cumbrian coast and while Wainwright’s Coast to Coast walk is not one of Britain’s official National Trails it is one of the most popular long distance paths in the country. Whilst crossing northerner England from St Bees the walk concludes in Yorkshire’s eastern coast at Robin Hood’s Bay.

While the walk is not as demanding as the Pennine Way, the Coast to Coast walk should be treated with respect as it does have some challenging sections especially in the west.

The Coast to Coast Walk is 190 miles in total (according to a recent re-measure the real distance is almost 220 miles) and if it was your intention to complete the walk in one go, its estimated it would take something like 12 to 14 days to finish depending on fitness levels and stop overs. There are some high and tricky ascents to negotiate along the trail, although alternative routes are available to avoid the worst of these if you don’t fancy the challenge. The route is mostly un-sign posted so good map reading is essential.

According to our Alfred Wainwright the coast to coast walk is split into 12 official sections, although some allow a little longer on the more arduous sections.

As with most long distant paths the route is split into manageable sections that are easier to navigate and become mini walks. When planning your walk these smaller section maybe between lodgings or even a small walk and a day out.

Due to the popularity of the area and the Coast to Coast walk it is advisable to book in advance if you are planning on staying in the hotels, pubs, Bed and Breakfasts or campsites along the route.

Coast To Coast Walk

  1. St Bees
  2. St Bees – Ennerdale Bridge 14 miles.
  3. Ennerdale Bridge – Rosthwaite 14 miles.
  4. Rosthwaite – Patterdale 17 miles.
  5. Patterdale – Shap 16 miles.
  6. Shap – Kirby Stephen 21 miles.
  7. Kirby Stephen – Keld 13 miles.
  8. Keld – Reeth 11 miles.
  9. Reeth – Richmond 11 miles.
  10. Richmond – Ingleby Cross 23 miles.
  11. Ingleby Cross – Clay Bank Top 12 miles.
  12. Clay Bank Top – Glaisdale 18 miles.
  13. Glaisdale – Robin Hood’s Bay.

The below Google map shows two points of reference, one being the starting point and one being the finishing point of the Coast to Coast Walk.


View Coast To Coast Walk in a larger map

However you decide to complete this walk, in one go or in sections for a weekend break, or simply a day out, remember your good walking boots, equipment and enjoy the Coast To Coast Walk.