High Street Walk

High Street Walk

High Street Walk

High Street Walk

Is a great pub quiz question: which high street in England has no shops at all? The answer is the fell of that name – High Street is the highest summit in the Far Eastern fells at 2,700ft, making this an exhilarating walk. The summit of High Street walk is also known locally as Racecourse Hill, from the days when horse racing took place upon the vast flat summit.

The Romans built a road along the crest of High Street between forts at Ambleside and Brougham, near Penrith. The ascent of High Street from Mardale in my opinion is the most rewarding as it is somewhat removed from the ever popular tourist destinations of central Lakeland.

Traveling to Haweswater reservoir and along the road that traverses the lake with little traffic and probably no mobile phone signal set the theme for a day’s walk of peace and quiet. The road comes to a dead end at Mardale Head where there is currently a small free car park.

There are several routes one may take to ascent High Street walk, although for some, too complete 3 Wainwright fells in one day is a great achievement and this can be done with an approximate 5 to 6 hour walk. Weather and your level of fitness permitting, whilst I managed to complete the walk in just less than 6 hours. Taking my time, taking pictures as I walked and enjoying the fantastic scenery.

Leaving the car park follow the path around the lakes edge until you reach The Rigg, which is the large bit of land extended into Haweswater reservoir. The most popular route is to now take Rough Crag, although I had decided to make this High Street walk, a bigger circular walk and to ascend via Kidsty Howes leading to Kidsty Pike. Kidsty Pike being the first of the Wainwright fells complete on this days walk. During this first section of the walk up Kidsty Pike you will be on the coast to coast walk route traveling generally east to west.

High Street Walk

With the initial ascent of Kidsty Howes the path is clearly marked although rather steep, whilst quickly gaining altitude and not forgetting to turn and take in the view of Haweswater below. There is a rather rocky trail as you reach the top of the upward climb, which can be slippery so good boots are recommended at this point.

Clearing the rocky crag you have a nice walk along Kidsty Pike, whilst if you now look towards your left you will now clearly see Rough Crag, home to the only Golden Eagles in England. Having spoken to several locals it is believed to be only the male eagle now alive, alas no Golden Eagle today.

As you round the summit of Kidsty Pike Hayeswater will come into view as you descend slightly to your left towards High Street where you will see a small dry stone wall. Here there is a little confusion in the footpaths and I would recommend following the dry stone wall as this will take you to the summit of High Street marked by an Ordnance Survey triangulation point. This being something of an anti-climax with an almost flat top.

On a clear day it is possible to see all the way to Shap and the Pennines, along with the quarry at Shap. In the opposite direction you will have stunning views weather permitting towards Helvellyn and Striding Edge.

High Street Walk

I believe that it is only through taking this route that you will fully appreciate wherein the name High Street has evolved from the Roman times, as the marching Roman’s would probably have been safer on the top of the world as opposed to marching in the valley’s below. You can imagine the summit being busy with troops passing each other on army business.

Continue walking with the stone wall on your right until you come to a definitive fork in the path and taking the left fork towards Nan Bield Pass. Here dependent upon your level of fitness and the weather conditions it is possible to continue on to Harter Fell, or alternatively descend via Small Water. Should you decide to continue on to Harter Fell this would be your third Wainwright fell to ascend within the one walk and in one day.

For the purposes of this walk I am now going to split my walk into 2 and from here I would recommend continuing down the footpath and pass Small Water to your right on the clearly marked footpath returning to the car park.

Should you wish to continue on to complete the 3 Wainwright fells and wish to see my description of this extended walk plus the pictures I have taken please click the link Harter Fell walk.

Should you wish to see better quality photographs of this High Street walk please visit High Street Walk on our Lake District Walks Flickr account.

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Aira Force Walk

Aira Force Walk

Aira Force Waterfall, Ullswater

Aira Force Walk

Aira Force walk is probably the most famous of all the waterfalls within the Lake District National Park and makes for a great short woodland walk of approximately 2 hours, although it can be extended up on to High Force and Gowbarrow Fell following in part Aira Beck which rises onto the upper slopes of Stybarrow Dodd at a height of 720metres (2,362 ft).

Aira Force Walk can be accessed from several vantage points, whilst there is a National Trust car park on the Ullswater Lake road which is pay and display. There is free car parking currently available at 2 separate car parks on the A5091 heading towards Dockray. These offer an alternative walk to the Aira Force waterfall from above as opposed to walking upwards from the shores of Ullswater Lake, home to the daffodils that inspired Wordsworth’s most famous poem.

Aira Force Walk

Aira Force drops an impressive 66 feet down a rocky ravine and after heavy rain is impressive with a fine mist spray towards the bottom of the waterfall. In the 1870’s the Howard family of Greystoke Castle had an old hunting lodge or Peel tower (maybe similar to that of Dacre Castle) close to the shore renovated into what is now Lyulph’s Tower, set amongst its own sporting estate. The Howards landscaped the area around Aira Force walk, and used it is a pleasure garden, planting over half a million ornamental trees, and established a network of tracks, footpaths and bridges.

In 1906 Gowbarrow Park, including Aira Force came up for sale for housing plots. An appeal was launched by the recently formed National Trust, which resulted in the purchase of 750 acres.

Aira Force waterfall is now on land owned by the National Trust.

Any walk that is undertaken to visit Aira Force waterfall,  it is worth pointing out that depending on the time of year and recent rain fall that the footpaths and tracks can be very wet and even slippery where the paths consist of smooth stones.

Undertaking the Aira Force walk from the National Trust car par simply follow the footpaths and within a short distance you will see a bridge crossing the Aira beck and here you can simply choose to go clock wise or anti clock wise around the main Aira Force waterfall. Taking the anti-clock wise route cross the bridge and follow the footpath upwards and Aira Force walk through the woods and to view the woodland river scenery should take about 2 hours.

Aira Force Walk

To make more of a day’s outing to Aira Force it is worthy of a mention of the Royal Hotel which offers a friendly Cumbrian bar with a fine selection of Real Ales and food after a walk to or from Aira Force waterfall.

Should you wish to see better quality photographs of this Aira Force walk please visit Aira Force Waterfall on our Lake District Walks Flickr account.

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Helm Crag Walk

Helm Crag Staircase

Helm Crag Staircase

Helm Crag Walk

Helm Crag, near Grasmere

Grade: 3 Approximate length: 8 Miles

Despite Helm Crag Walk being of low height (approx 1,328ft) it sits prominently at the end of a ridge, easily seen from the village of Grasmere. This combined with the distinctive summit rocks at the south east end of the summit ridge, which provide the alternative name, ‘The Lion and the Lamb’ makes it one of the most recognised hills in the area, with the term Helm meaning ‘cloud capped hill’.

Alfred Wainwright wrote of Helms Crag walk that “The virtues of Helm Crag have not been lauded enough. It gives an exhilarating little climb, a brief essay in real mountaineering, and, in a region where all is beautiful, it makes a notable contribution to the charms and attractions of Grasmere”.

This is the only Wainwright that the man himself never summited due to the tricky nature of this final rocky climb.

Helm Crag walk offers a varied array of Lakeland scenery, with wooded glades, spring blue bells, rocky out crops and open fells covered with ferns dependent on time of year.

Starting from Easedale Road within the village of Grasmere, follow the road whilst crossing over Easedale Beck. Pass the road sign posted Youth Hostel on your right and continue upon the road until the road turns sharply to the right.

Helm Crag Walk

I should point out that at this point there are 2 possible routes you may take, whilst this particular walk will follow the Lancrigg route as opposed to the Far Easdale and Helm Crag walk footpath.

Having rounded the sharp bend coming into view you should see a footbridge on your left which would take you to Easdale Tarn. Continue on the road keeping to your right until the road divides, taking the Lancrigg road, where it is possible to enjoy refreshments, such as teas, coffees and light lunches at Lancrigg Vegetarian Country House Hotel.

Taking the track to the front of the house you will pass through 2 gates and into a wooded area where the path is clearly marked. Keeping to the path follow this as it meanders through the wood and gently climbs upwards and through the woods. The track will traverse the farm fields with a dry stone wall to your left, whilst you walk upon level ground before passing through a gate.

The height of Helm Crag walk will now become apparent as it rises to your right, with a steep climb to come. You will arrive at what I can only explain with similarities to a stone staircase, although this staircase rises considerable higher and when wet can be slippery. On reaching the top turn left following the track which is clearly visible and this will take you to the summit.

On reaching the summit this is an ideal stop for refreshments, although it can be windy and you will be rewarded with stunning views of Grasmere below and the main road between Keswick and Grasmere but a threaded black line in the valley bottom.

Helm Crag Walk

Follow the ridge from Helm Crag walk as it gently swings around to descend towards Far Easdale where you simply follow the track downwards, although in places it is not so visible. Having descended you will join the footpath from Far Easdale and turning left follow this footpath down Far Easedale Gill which will bring you back to Easedale House and the road back to Grasmere.

It is possible when you join Far Easdale Gill footpath to turn right and continue over to Easdale Tarn should you desire to extend your walk, weather and time permitting.

Please note that our walk description of Great How, like any outdoor activity can be extremely dangerous and can result in permanent disability or even loss of life. Participants should be aware and except these risks whilst being responsible for their own safety. Always seek advice and information before embarking on any outdoor activity.

Should you wish to see better quality photographs of this Helm Crag walk please visit Helm Crag on our Lake District Walks Flickr account.

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Fairfield Walks Near Grasmere

Fairfield Walks, Horseshoe, Grasmere

Fairfield Walks, Horseshoe, Grasmere

Fairfield Walks

Fairfield Walks, near Grasmere

Grade: 1 Approximate length: 9 Miles

Fairfield or more commonly known as the Fairfield Horseshoe is a classic Lakeland walk. As the name implies, the route follows the long horse shoe ridge, whose centre ‘nail’ is the summit of Fairfield, which runs around the valley of the Rydal Beck to the north – west of Ambleside.

There are many points where you may start a Fairfield Walks such as from Great Rigg, Seat Sandal, or Heron Pike, either way prepare, yourself for some really spectacular views and a long walk. You could also continue on to Dollywaggon Pike, Grisedale Forest, St Sunday Crag, or even end up at Ambleside.

Should you be staying for several days in the Grasmere area, then I would firstly recommend a walk to Easdale Tarn walks and Alcock Tarn walks, reason being whilst enjoying Farirfield walks on a good day you will have fantastic views of your previously completed walks. I would also point out at this stage that Fairfield walks is more of a hike than a walk.

This Fairfield walks starts from the village of Grasmere and proceed from the centre of the village making your way towards the A591 being the main road from Keswick to Ambleside. Should you wish to enjoy a visit to Wordsworth’s Dove cottage first thing in the morning before embarking on this walk, then Dove cottage is very close by and well worth a visit. Upon reaching the A591 make your way towards the Swan Hotel and taking the road to the right of the hotel as you look directly at the hotel, keep walking until you see a signpost for Greenhead Gill and Alcock Tarn also on your right.

Fairfield Walks

Continue up this pleasant country lane, with the stream to your right, until you reach the gate with the sign post for Stone Arthur and Alcock Tarn. Turning left follow the clearly marked footpath as you start climbing upwards towards Stone Arthur, keeping the stonewall on the left. This is a rather rewarding ascent whilst also steep, great fun and good exercise. Once clear of the trees you will be rewarded with some stunning views of Grasmere.

Stone Arthur is a good place to stop for a drink or light refreshments as Great Rigg and the summit of Fairfield are exposed and can be windy even on a calm still day.

Keep going until you reach the rocky peak of Stone Arthur, an excellent viewpoint, and then carry on along the ridge. You are now gently climbing to the summit of Great Rigg. Once you reach Great Rigg you will have an excellent view over the Rydal Beck valley and beyond.

Fairfield Walks

Walk down into the valley beyond Great Rigg then climb back up to the peak of Fairfield. On arrival at the summit of Fairfield within view will be Helvelyn, Grisedale Tarn, Ullswater Lake, Rydal Water and Windermere Lake.

Follow the path to the left from the summit following a line of stones continuing down the valley to Grisedale Hause (which is the low point between Fairfield and Seat Sandal), ahead to the right of you, you will see Grisedale Tarn. This foot path is not the easiest to find although once again look out for the small stone piles. The path is loose stones and can be slippery so take care. When you reach Grisedale Hause take a left turn when you find a gap in the old stonewall following a rough but clearly marked path down the left side of Tongue Gill. This is a nice even decent with a easily visible path.  As the ridge ends on your right there will be a footbridge over the river. Cross over and take a left along a clear track until you reach the A591 and turning left you are but a short walk back to the Swan Hotel where Fairfield Walks started.

Should you wish to see better quality photographs of this Fairfield walks please visit Fairfield Horseshoe on our Lake District Walks Flickr account.

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Alcock Tarn Walks, Grasmere

Alcock Tarn Walks, Near Grasmere

Alcock Tarn Walks, Near Grasmere

Alcock Tarn Walks

Alcock Tarn and Heron Pike near Grasmere

Grade: 3 Approximate length: 4 Miles

Alcock Tarn walks lies 1000 feet above Grasmere village on the western flanks of Heron Pike, whilst originally a natural tarn named Butter Crags Tarn, until the late 19th Century when Mr Alcock of The Hollins in Grasmere enlarged the tarn by means of a small stone and earth dam to create a trout lake.

It is well worth the effort of climbing 1000 feet from Grasmere, being a rather attractive tarn with grassy banks and some reed beds around the edge. The views to the south and west, with Grasmere in the valley below are stunning.

Leaving the village of Grasmere, make your way towards the A591 and the Swan Hotel. Traveling from Keswick to Ambleside on the A591 you will pass the Swan Hotel on your left and some 600 yards after you will find a convenient layby, wherein you may currently park free.

Alcock Tarn Walks

Following the road to the immediate right of the Swan Hotel make your way up this country lane leaving Grasmere behind you. On the right hand side you will see Greenhead Gill and Alcock Tarn walks clearly signposted. As the road makes its way gently uphill there will be a stream upon your right. Immediately in front of you there will be a gate when you reach the end of the road, passing through the gate follow the arrow to your right.

Follow the footpath up the hill then go right over the footbridge across Greenhead Gill. You will then see a well looked after footpath with yellow arrows bending to the right and steeply uphill between Heron Pike and Grey Crag. Traveling upwards with the stone wall to your right the path divides, whilst taking the path to your right this will take you to Alcock Tarn. You will first find a smaller tarn full of reeds with Alcock Tarn just beyond it.

Should you wish for a longer more strenuous walk, where the path divides in 2, simply continue along the other path following Greenhead path. This is a seldom used path and eventually disappears, although you will come to a small beck feeding Greenhead Gill on your right which I suggest you take climbing as high as you can then travers back towards Alcock Tarn. This route will allow you to drop down onto the tarn with enhanced views of the surrounding area.

You can walk along the right hand side to the end of Alcock Tarn. Head towards a gap in the dry stone wall go through the gap and keep walking along the rocky outcrop, an excellent view of Grasmere becomes visible below you. Follow the path steeply downhill passing through a gate then keep walking with the wall on your left hand side. This path leads you into a wooded area, the path swings to the left and pass through another gate in a fence then a gate in a wall. The footpath now continues between two walls, continue down until you reach the public road.

Alcock Tarn Walk

If you turn right at this point you will drop downhill pass Dove Cottage to reach the A591 and opposite is the road back into Grasmere village.

Please note that our walks description of Alcock Tarn walks, like any outdoor activity can be extremely dangerous and can result in permanent disability or even loss of life. Participants should be aware and except these risks whilst being responsible for their own safety. Always seek advice and information before embarking on any outdoor activity.

Should you wish to see better quality photographs of this Alcock Tarn walk please visit Alcock Tarn oun our Lake District Walks Flickr account.

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Easedale Tarn Walks, Grasmere

Easedale Tarn

Easedale Tarn

Easedale Tarn

Easedale Tarn, near Grasmere

Grade: 3 Approximate length: 5 Miles

Easedale Tarn is approximately 910 feet above sea level.

I am no literary genius, or new age poet, I stake no claim to be a modern Wainwright, although Easedale Tarn Grasmere happens to be one of my favourite walks. This particular walk once loved by Wordsworth and his wife Mary, is a must should, you be staying in Grasmere.

This is a very popular low level walk, with an exceptional feel of being in the mountains, whilst an easy walk to follow but with a steep climb to Easedale Tarn itself, with some rough ground on the decent, depending on your return route. The Tarns outflow is Sourmilk Gill, named after the milky white waterfalls, which run east towards Grasmere. The Gill displays impressive water scenery when seen from Grasmere, and from the footpath to the tarn.

At this point I have to recommend the purchase of an Ordnance Survey map, having recently walked this footpath, whilst being spoilt for choice, should you wish to extend you’re walk.  On reaching Easedale Tarn you could continue on to Helm Crag, Sergeant Man, High Raise, Langdale Pikes, and Silver How.

Easedale Tarn walks, there and back again is around 5 miles depending where you start from in Grasmere, whilst it is also possible on reaching the tarn to walk completely around its shores. At the point where the beck leaves the tarn is a good spot for lunch, or a snack break, whilst taking in the stunning scenery.

Starting from the main visitor car park in the village of Grasmere, turn right leaving the car park heading towards the church of St Oswald church which is worthy of a slight detour. Following the road as it meanders through Grasmere you will come to Easedale Road on your left with a stone sign set within a dry stone wall near the bus stop. Follow the road out of the village and cross over Easedale Beck. Pass the road signposted Youth Hostel on your right continuing on until the road turns sharply to the right.

Easedale Tarn

I should point out that at this point there are 2 possible routes you may take, whilst this particular walk will follow the Easedale Tarn walks footpath as opposed to the Far Easedale and Helm Crag footpath.

Having rounded the sharp bend coming into view you should see a footbridge on your left where you leave the road. Take the footpath, crossing the bridge follow the track alongside the river in the direction of the waterfall, which you should be able to see ahead of you.

Prior to crossing Blindtarn Gill the footpath divides into two, take the left hand footpath keeping the river to your right and do not cross the stone bridge. Keeping to the track you will commence to gently climb with the footpath dividing into two once again, take the right hand path and do not enter the field.  Crossing Blindtarn Gill continue along the track which then climbs a slope on the left of the Sourmilk Gill, dependent upon recent rain volumes you will have a great view of the water falls as you climb on you’re right. Walk between Ecton and Brinhowe Crags which will gradually climb to the bottom of Easedale Tarn, opening on to the tarn and maybe lunch.

Depending on levels of fitness, you may walk around the tarn, return by the same route, or in the alternative return via Far Easedale Gill.

Easedale Tarn

To return via Far Easedale, as the beck leaves the tarn cross on the stepping stones and on the far side of the valley drop back down along a rough footpath. The path is clear to begin with but becomes obscure and marshy in places as it crosses a feeder to the beck. You will now climb over the neck of Ecton Crag and drop back down in the direction of Far Easedale Gill. The route isn’t perfectly clear at this point, but there are the odd yellow arrows just to let you know you are on the right route.

Keep going until you reach the footpath over the Gill, here there is a footbridge crossing Far Easedale beck, then turn right following the clearly marked track until you reach the road, following the road you should find yourself back at the start of the walk.

Please note that our walk description of Easedale Tarn walks, like any outdoor activity can be extremely dangerous and can result in permanent disability or even loss of life. Participants should be aware and except these risks whilst being responsible for their own safety. Always seek advice and information before embarking on any outdoor activity.

Should you wish to see better quality photographs of this Easedale Tarn walk please visit Easedale Tarn Lake District Walks Flickr account.

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Wainwright Fells 214

214 Wainwright Fells

214 Wainwright Fells

Wainwright Fells

Alfred Wainwright in his Pictorial Guides to the Lakeland Fells incorporates 214 fells described within his seven books. Written over a period of 13 years from 1952, whilst they consist entirely of reproductions of Alfred Wainwright manuscripts, hand produced in pen and ink with no typeset material.

Many people simply come to the Lake District to enjoy the beautiful scenery and spectacular walks with no other objective in mind other than to simply enjoy.

For some it is a great challenge to follow in the footsteps of the great man himself, and enjoy the countless walks by completing the 214 Wainwright fells described by Alfred Wainwright.

Visiting all 214 of Wainwright fells is a common form of peak bragging.

Over two million copies of the Alfred Wainwright Pictorial Guides to the Lakeland fells have been sold worldwide since their first publication way back in 1955 and 1966.

In the notes at the end of Book 7, Wainwright lists what he considers to be the ‘finest half dozen’ fells in Lakeland. His list consists of;

Wainwright Fells

Scafell Pike

Bowfell

Pillar

Great Gable

Blencathra

Crinkle Crags

Below is the full list of all 214 Wainwright fells in book order.

The Wainwright Fells

No Mountain Book Rank By Height Height(feet) Height(metres) OS Grid Ref
1 Arnison Crag Book 1 – Eastern Fells 194 1,421 433 NY 394 150
2 Birkhouse Moor Book 1 – Eastern Fells 78 2,356 718 NY 363 160
3 Birks Book 1 – Eastern Fells 125 2,041 622 NY 382 145
4 Catstye Cam Book 1 – Eastern Fells 10 2,920 890 NY 348 158
5 Clough Head Book 1 – Eastern Fells 74 2,382 726 NY 334 225
6 Dollywaggon Pike Book 1 – Eastern Fells 18 2,815 858 NY 346 131
7 Dove Crag Book 1 – Eastern Fells 38 2,598 792 NY 375 104
8 Fairfield Book 1 – Eastern Fells 13 2,864 873 NY 359 117
9 Glenridding Dodd Book 1 – Eastern Fells 191 1,450 442 NY 380 176
10 Gowbarrow Fell Book 1 – Eastern Fells 181 1,579 481 NY 408 218
11 Great Dodd Book 1 – Eastern Fells 19 2,812 857 NY 342 206
12 Great Mell Fell Book 1 – Eastern Fells 155 1,762 537 NY 397 254
13 Great Rigg Book 1 – Eastern Fells 54 2,513 766 NY 356 105
14 Hart Crag Book 1 – Eastern Fells 27 2,698 822 NY 369 112
15 Hart Side Book 1 – Eastern Fells 61 2,481 756 NY 359 197
16 Hartsop Above How Book 1 – Eastern Fells 137 1,903 580 NY 383 120
17 Helvellyn Book 1 – Eastern Fells 3 3,118 950 NY 342 152
18 Heron Pike Book 1 – Eastern Fells 128 2,008 612 NY 356 083
19 High Hartsop Dodd Book 1 – Eastern Fells 165 1,702 519 NY 394 108
20 High Pike (Scandale) Book 1 – Eastern Fells 109 2,152 656 NY 374 088
21 Little Hart Crag Book 1 – Eastern Fells 120 2,091 637 NY 387 100
22 Little Mell Fell Book 1 – Eastern Fells 173 1,657 505 NY 423 240
23 Low Pike Book 1 – Eastern Fells 172 1,667 508 NY 374 078
24 Middle Dodd Book 1 – Eastern Fells 111 2,146 654 NY 397 096
25 Nab Scar Book 1 – Eastern Fells 193 1,444 440 NY 355 072
26 Nethermost Pike Book 1 – Eastern Fells 9 2,923 891 NY 344 142
27 Raise Book 1 – Eastern Fells 12 2,897 883 NY 343 174
28 Red Screes Book 1 – Eastern Fells 49 2,546 776 NY 396 088
29 St Sunday Crag Book 1 – Eastern Fells 22 2,759 841 NY 369 134
30 Seat Sandal Book 1 – Eastern Fells 69 2,415 736 NY 344 114
31 Sheffield Pike Book 1 – Eastern Fells 99 2,215 675 NY 369 182
32 Stone Arthur Book 1 – Eastern Fells 175 1,640 500 NY 348 092
33 Stybarrow Dodd Book 1 – Eastern Fells 21 2,766 843 NY 343 189
34 Watsons Dodd Book 1 – Eastern Fells 41 2,589 789 NY 336 196
35 White Side Book 1 – Eastern Fells 16 2,832 863 NY 338 167
36 Angletarn Pikes Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 143 1,860 567 NY 413 148
37 Arthur’s Pike Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 157 1,745 532 NY 461 207
38 Beda Fell Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 170 1,670 509 NY 429 172
39 Bonscale Pike Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 161 1,718 524 NY 453 201
40 Branstree Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 81 2,339 713 NY 478 100
41 Brock Crags Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 144 1,842 561 NY 417 137
42 Caudale Moor Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 55 2,502 763 NY 419 100
43 Froswick Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 77 2,362 720 NY 435 085
44 Gray Crag Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 90 2,293 699 NY 247 119
45 Grey Crag Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 118 2,093 638 NY 497 072
46 Hallin Fell Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 203 1,273 388 NY 433 198
47 Harter Fell Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 48 2,552 778 NY 460 093
48 Hartsop Dodd Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 126 2,028 618 NY 412 118
49 High Raise (Martindale) Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 31 2,631 802 NY 448 143
50 High Street Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 25 2,718 828 NY 441 110
51 Ill Bell Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 60 2,484 757 NY 437 077
52 Kentmere Pike Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 71 2,395 730 NY 466 078
53 Kidsty Pike Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 46 2,560 780 NY 447 126
54 The Knott Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 66 2,425 739 NY 437 127
55 Loadpot Hill Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 102 2,201 671 NY 457 181
56 Mardale Ill Bell Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 59 2,493 760 NY 448 101
57 The Nab Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 139 1,890 576 NY 434 152
58 Place Fell Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 108 2,156 657 NY 406 170
59 Rampsgill Head Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 39 2,598 792 NY 443 129
60 Rest Dodd Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 92 2,283 696 NY 433 137
61 Sallows Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 166 1,693 516 NY 437 040
62 Selside Pike Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 110 2,149 655 NY 491 112
63 Shipman Knotts Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 133 1,926 587 NY 472 062
64 Sour Howes Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 180 1,585 483 NY 428 032
65 Steel Knotts Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 195 1,417 432 NY 440 181
66 Tarn Crag (Londsleddale) Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 104 2,178 664 NY 488 079
67 Thornthwaite Crag Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 43 2,572 784 NY 432 100
68 Troutbeck Tongue Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 207 1,194 364 NY 422 064
69 Wansfell Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 178 1,597 487 NY 404 053
70 Wether Hill Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 103 2,198 670 NY 456 168
71 Yoke Book 2 – Far Eastern Fells 85 2,316 706 NY 438 067
72 Armboth Fell Book 3 – Central Fells 182 1,572 479 NY 297 160
73 Bleaberry Fell Book 3 – Central Fells 132 1,936 590 NY 286 196
74 Blea Rigg Book 3 – Central Fells 152 1,776 541 NY 302 078
75 Calf Crag Book 3 – Central Fells 154 1,762 537 NY 302 104
76 Eagle Crag Book 3 – Central Fells 164 1,706 520 NY 275 121
77 Gibson Knott Book 3 – Central Fells 198 1,379 420 NY 318 099
78 Grange Fell Book 3 – Central Fells 200 1,345 410 NY 265 163
79 Great Crag Book 3 – Central Fells 192 1,444 440 NY 270 147
80 Harrison Stickle Book 3 – Central Fells 68 2,415 736 NY 282 074
81 Helm Crag Book 3 – Central Fells 201 1,329 405 NY 326 094
82 High Raise (Langdale) Book 3 – Central Fells 56 2,500 762 NY 281 095
83 High Rigg Book 3 – Central Fells 210 1,161 354 NY 309 220
84 High Seat Book 3 – Central Fells 130 1,995 608 NY 287 180
85 High Tove Book 3 – Central Fells 167 1,690 515 NY 289 165
86 Loft Crag Book 3 – Central Fells 97 2,231 680 NY 277 071
87 Loughrigg Fell Book 3 – Central Fells 211 1,099 335 NY 347 051
88 Pavey Ark Book 3 – Central Fells 89 2,297 700 NY 285 079
89 Pike O’Stickle Book 3 – Central Fells 83 2,326 709 NY 274 074
90 Raven Crag Book 3 – Central Fells 186 1,512 461 NY 303 188
91 Sergeant Man Book 3 – Central Fells 72 2,395 730 NY 286 089
92 Sergeant’s Crag Book 3 – Central Fells 141 1,873 571 NY 274 114
93 Silver How Book 3 – Central Fells 202 1,292 394 NY 325 066
94 Steel Fell Book 3 – Central Fells 146 1,814 553 NY 319 112
95 Tarn Crag (Easedale) Book 3 – Central Fells 150 1.804 550 NY 304 093
96 Thunacar Knott Book 3 – Central Fells 76 2,372 723 NY 280 080
97 Ullscarf Book 3 – Central Fells 75 2,382 726 NY 292 122
98 Walla Crag Book 3 – Central Fells 204 1,243 379 NY 277 213
99 Allen Crags Book 4 – Southern Fells 42 2,575 785 NY 237 085
100 Black Fell Book 4 – Southern Fells 212 1,060 323 NY 340 016
101 Bowfell Book 4 – Southern Fells 6 2,960 902 NY 245 064
102 Brim Fell Book 4 – Southern Fells 37 2,611 796 SD 271 986
103 Cold Pike Book 4 – Southern Fells 88 2,300 701 NY 263 036
104 Coniston Old Man Book 4 – Southern Fells 30 2,635 803 SD 272 978
105 Crinkle Crags Book 4 – Southern Fells 17 2,818 859 NY 248 049
106 Dow Crag Book 4 – Southern Fells 47 2,552 778 SD 263 978
107 Esk Pike Book 4 – Southern Fells 11 2,903 885 NY 237 075
108 Glaramara Book 4 – Southern Fells 44 2,569 783 NY 247 106
109 Great Carrs Book 4 – Southern Fells 45 2,559 780 NY 270 009
110 Great End Book 4 – Southern Fells 5 2,986 910 NY 227 084
111 Green Crag Book 4 – Southern Fells 176 1,604 489 SD 200 983
112 Grey Friar Book 4 – Southern Fells 52 2,526 770 NY 260 004
113 Hard Knott Book 4 – Southern Fells 151 1,802 549 NY 232 024
114 Harter Fell (Eskdale) Book 4 – Southern Fells 112 2,141 653 SD 219 997
115 Holme Fell Book 4 – Southern Fells 213 1,040 317 NY 315 007
116 Illgill Head Book 4 – Southern Fells 129 1,998 609 NY 165 048
117 Lingmell Book 4 – Southern Fells 35 2,625 800 NY 209 081
118 Lingmoor Fell Book 4 – Southern Fells 184 1,539 469 NY 303 046
119 Pike O’Blisco Book 4 – Southern Fells 86 2,313 705 NY 271 042
120 Rossett Pike Book 4 – Southern Fells 115 2,133 650 NY 249 076
121 Rosthwaite Fell Book 4 – Southern Fells 149 1,807 550 NY 258 125
122 Scafell Book 4 – Southern Fells 2 3,162 964 NY 207 065
123 Scafell Pike Book 4 – Southern Fells 1 3,210 978 NY 215 072
124 Seathwaite Fell Book 4 – Southern Fells 123 2,073 632 NY 229 102
125 Slight Side Book 4 – Southern Fells 57 2,499 762 NY 210 050
126 Swirl How Book 4 – Southern Fells 33 2,630 802 NY 273 005
127 Wetherlam Book 4 – Southern Fells 58 2,502 762 NY 288 011
128 Whin Rigg Book 4 – Southern Fells 156 1,755 535 NY 151 034
129 Bakestall Book 5 – Northern Fells 100 2,201 668 NY 266 307
130 Bannerdale Crags Book 5 – Northern Fells 96 2.241 677 NY 335 290
131 Binsey Book 5 – Northern Fells 190 1,466 447 NY 225 355
132 Blencathra Book 5 – Northern Fells 14 2,848 868 NY 323 277
133 Bowscale Fell Book 5 – Northern Fells 87 2,303 702 NY 334 306
134 Brae Fell Book 5 – Northern Fells 134 1,920 585 NY 289 351
135 Carl Side Book 5 – Northern Fells 64 2,448 746 NY 255 281
136 Carrock Fell Book 5 – Northern Fells 105 2,174 663 NY 342 337
137 Dodd Book 5 – Northern Fells 174 1,612 502 NY 244 273
138 Great Calva Book 5 – Northern Fells 95 2,264 690 NY 290 312
139 Great Cockup Book 5 – Northern Fells 159 1,720 526 NY 273 333
140 Great Sca Fell Book 5 – Northern Fells 114 2,131 649 NY 291 339
141 High Pike (Caldbeck) Book 5 – Northern Fells 107 2,157 658 NY 319 350
142 Knott Book 5 – Northern Fells 82 2,329 710 NY 296 330
143 Latrigg Book 5 – Northern Fells 206 1,203 367 NY 279 247
144 Longlands Fell Book 5 – Northern Fells 179 1,580 483 NY 276 354
145 Long Side Book 5 – Northern Fells 70 2,408 734 NY 248 284
146 Lonscale Fell Book 5 – Northern Fells 80 2,346 715 NY 286 271
147 Meal Fell Book 5 – Northern Fells 148 1,770 541 NY 282 338
148 Mungrisdale Common Book 5 – Northern Fells 121 2,068 630 NY 311 292
149 Skiddaw Book 5 – Northern Fells 4 3,054 931 NY 260 291
150 Skiddaw Little Man Book 5 – Northern Fells 15 2,838 865 NY 267 278
151 Souther Fell Book 5 – Northern Fells 163 1,680 522 NY 335 292
152 Ullock Pike Book 5 – Northern Fells 98 2,230 680 NY 244 288
153 Ard Crags Book 6 – North Western Fells 136 1,906 581 NY 207 198
154 Barf Book 6 – North Western Fells 185 1,536 468 NY 215 267
155 Barrow Book 6 – North Western Fells 188 1,494 455 NY 227 218
156 Broom Fell Book 6 – North Western Fells 169 1,677 511 NY 194 272
157 Castle Crag Book 6 – North Western Fells 214 951 290 NY 249 159
158 Catbells Book 6 – North Western Fells 189 1,481 451 NY 244 198
159 Causey Pike Book 6 – North Western Fells 119 2,090 637 NY 219 209
160 Dale Head Book 6 – North Western Fells 63 2,470 753 NY 223 153
161 Eel Crag Book 6 – North Western Fells 24 2,753 839 NY 193 204
162 Grasmoor Book 6 – North Western Fells 20 2,795 852 NY 175 204
163 Graystones Book 6 – North Western Fells 187 1,496 456 NY 178 265
164 Grisedale Pike Book 6 – North Western Fells 40 2,595 791 NY 198 225
165 High Spy Book 6 – North Western Fells 113 2,143 653 NY 234 162
166 Hindscarth Book 6 – North Western Fells 73 2,385 727 NY 216 165
167 Hopegill Head Book 6 – North Western Fells 53 2,525 770 NY 186 222
168 Knott Rigg Book 6 – North Western Fells 145 1,824 556 NY 197 189
169 Ling Fell Book 6 – North Western Fells 205 1,224 373 NY 180 286
170 Lord’s Seat Book 6 – North Western Fells 147 1,811 552 NY 204 266
171 Maiden Moor Book 6 – North Western Fells 138 1,890 576 NY 237 171
172 Outerside Book 6 – North Western Fells 142 1,863 568 NY 211 215
173 Rannerdale Knotts Book 6 – North Western Fells 209 1,165 355 NY 167 183
174 Robinson Book 6 – North Western Fells 67 2.417 737 NY 202 169
175 Sail Book 6 – North Western Fells 50 2,536 773 NY 198 203
176 Sale Fell Book 6 – North Western Fells 208 1,178 359 NY 194 297
177 Scar Crags Book 6 – North Western Fells 101 2,205 672 NY 209 207
178 Wandope Book 6 – North Western Fells 51 2,533 772 NY 188 197
179 Whinlatter Book 6 – North Western Fells 160 1,722 525 NY 197 249
180 Whiteless Pike Book 6 – North Western Fells 106 2,165 660 NY 180 190
181 Whiteside Book 6 – North Western Fells 84 2,320 707 NY 170 220
182 Base Brown Book 7 – Western Fells 117 2,120 646 NY 225 115
183 Blake Fell Book 7 – Western Fells 140 1,878 573 NY 110 197
184 Brandreth Book 7 – Western Fells 79 2,344 715 NY 215 119
185 Buckbarrow Book 7 – Western Fells 197 1,378 420 NY 136 061
186 Burnbank Fell Book 7 – Western Fells 183 1,558 475 NY 110 209
187 Caw Fell Book 7 – Western Fells 94 2,264 690 NY 132 110
188 Crag Fell Book 7 – Western Fells 162 1,716 523 NY 097 144
189 Fellbarrow Book 7 – Western Fells 199 1,363 416 NY 132 242
190 Fleetwith Pike Book 7 – Western Fells 116 2,126 648 NY 206 142
191 Gavel Fell Book 7 – Western Fells 158 1,726 526 NY 117 184
192 Great Borne Book 7 – Western Fells 127 2,021 616 NY 124 164
193 Great Gable Book 7 – Western Fells 7 2,949 899 NY 211 103
194 Green Gable Book 7 – Western Fells 34 2,628 801 NY 215 107
195 Grey Knotts Book 7 – Western Fells 91 2,287 697 NY 217 126
196 Grike Book 7 – Western Fells 177 1,601 488 NY 085 141
197 Haycock Book 7 – Western Fells 36 2,615 797 NY 145 107
198 Haystacks Book 7 – Western Fells 131 1,959 597 NY 193 132
199 Hen Comb Book 7 – Western Fells 171 1,670 509 NY 132 181
200 High Crag Book 7 – Western Fells 65 2,441 744 NY 181 140
201 High Stile Book 7 – Western Fells 29 2,648 807 NY 167 148
202 Kirk Fell Book 7 – Western Fells 32 2,630 802 NY 195 105
203 Lank Rigg Book 7 – Western Fells 153 1,775 541 NY 092 120
204 Low Fell Book – Western Fells 196 1,404 428 NY 137 226
205 Mellbreak Book – Western Fells 168 1,680 512 NY 148 186
206 Middle Fell Book 7 – Western Fells 135 1,908 582 NY 151 073
207 Pillar Book 7 – Western Fells 8 2,927 892 NY 171 121
208 Red Pike (Buttermere) Book 7 – Western Fells 62 2,479 755 NY 161 155
209 Red Pike (Wasdale) Book 7 – Western Fells 26 2,710 826 NY 165 106
210 Scoat Fell Book 7 – Western Fells 23 2,760 841 NY 159 114
211 Seatallan Book 7 – Western Fells 93 2,270 692 NY 140 084
212 Starling Dodd Book 7 – Western Fells 122 2,077 633 NY 142 157
213 Steeple Book 7 – Western Fells 28 2,687 819 NY 158 117
214 Yewbarrow Book 7 – Western Fells 124 2,060 628 NY 173 085
214 Wainwright Fells

214 Wainwright Fells

Keswick Walks

Sunset From Latrigg, Keswick & Derwentwater

Sunset From Latrigg, Keswick & Derwentwater

Keswick Walks

Keswick is regarded by some as the capital of the Lake District and as such is the base for many weekend breaks, walking holidays and simple get away from it all relaxing breaks.

There is an endless combination of Keswick walks around the town and surrounding area, suitable for all ages and abilities, which are easily accessible such as, Derwentwater and Borrowdale. Walkers may choose from gentle strolls to full day’s mountain hiking, with many in between.

A few of my personal favourites include Latrigg, Walla Crag, Castlerigg Stone circle and the walking and cycling Railway path. This combination of Keswick walks offers something for everyone.

The Keswick Walks Railway Path

The Keswick Railway path is a purpose built path which offers a relatively even and flat nature walk. The route follows the valley bottom of the river Greta heading out of Keswick towards the Lakeland village of Threlkeld and the well-known Lake District mountain of Blencathra. It is hard to get lost on the Railway path and is simply a case of following the path, making this a good family walk, with children and dogs. This walks path is buggy friendly, whilst suitable for wheelchair users at the Keswick side, and runs approximately 4 miles in total. Once you have walked as far as you desire, simply retrace your steps and amble back enjoying the fauna and flora of this Keswick walks.

Friers Crag / Around Derwentwater

This is one of the great local short level walks, suitable for children and prams, whilst suitable for the disabled, with great views of Derwentwater and surrounding fells. Starting with your back to the Keswick Information Centre, take the right hand exit into Lake Road and continue for approximately 150 metres. Take the paved road which is still Lake Road down to the right under the subway. On leaving the subway continue ahead with Hope Park on your right. Bear right past the wishing well and go past the Theatre on your left. As you arrive at the lake continue ahead onto the gravel track to Friers Crag. This particular one of our Keswick walks is approximately 4 miles and with little or no climb and should take about 1.5 hours to complete.

Keswick Walks Latrigg

Of all the local Keswick walks Latrigg is a good moderate walk which will push your level of fitness and therefore be a good indicator before you try any of the more impressive Lakeland fells and mountains. The Latrigg walks are generally circular by nature starting at Fitz Park and on up Spooney Lane across woodlands and fields. Then following the footpath to the summit and an amazing viewpoint of the surrounding area. This particular Keswick walks is approximately 6 miles and climbs about 1,000 feet and should take about 3 hours to complete.

Keswick Walks Sunset

Keswick Walks Sunset

Keswick is most definitely well situated for any walking trip or holiday, being centrally located within the Northern Lake District, exploring this area of outstanding natural beauty, with exceptional Lakeland views from such destinations as Skiddaw, Blencathra, the Helvellyn Range and the Borrowdale fells all within walking distance or a short, car bus or launch ride away. At this point I believe it is worth mentioning the Ullswater launch as this is a marvellous way to access the Helvellyn range and Striding Edge walks, although it is great do complete a day’s walking being car free where ever possible.

Equipment

For any day out enjoying our local Keswick walks it is always advisable to go well prepared and with good gear. This is the secret of enjoying walking anywhere, and all types of walks. Don’t compromise on your own comfort and safety for the sake of a cheap or rushed purchase, as it’s simply not worth it in the long run. Remember quality lasts long after the price is forgotten. Being safe, warm and dry, remembering this is the Lake District after all and it does rain.

Keswick History.

The valleys and surrounding area of Keswick has a strong history of copper and slate production, with Honister slate mine and the Threlkeld quarry worth a visit.

Perhaps one of the most famous discoveries, was that of graphite in Borrowdale around 1550. Derwent pencils are renowned for their quality and the Pencil Museum in Keswick will lead you through how they lay claim to the world’s first graphite pencil.

Whatever Keswick walks you ultimately embark on I hope you enjoy.

Coast To Coast Cycling

Coast To Coast Cycling

Coast To Coast Cycling

Coast to Coast Cycling

 

Similar to Wainwright’s Coast to Coast walk the equivalent for long distance cyclists is the Sea to Sea or C2C as it is better known. Coast to coast cycling offers some of the most spectacular scenery in Great Britain. This is the UK’s most popular cycle route and is approximately 140 miles long.

The coast to coast cycling route is very similar to the walking route in so much as it starts at the Irish Sea at St Bees on the Cumbrian coast, the route crosses the Lakeland fells, the Eden Valley, the Pennines, the Yorkshire Dales, the Cleveland Hills, and finally the North Yorkshire Moors before reaching Robin Hood’s Bay on the East Coast. On route you will pass through three contrasting National Parks and some of England’s finest scenery.

Coast To Coast Cycling

Unlike Wainwright’s coast to coast there are several variations of start and finishing points when cycling with both Workington and Whitehaven being popular starting points, whilst Tynemouth and Sunderland are also considered great finishing points.

Dependent upon the route you choose this may include Black Hill, the highest point on the National Cycle Network at 609 meters.

Whichever route you ultimately decide upon when you get your map out and considering who may be accompanying you it is always advisable to choice a route that is within your capabilities.

The route is covered by the National Cycle Network map number seven, and this map is essential for the ride as the route makes use of regular roads, bridleways, old railways etc and, as such, is not a single waymarked cycle track. Therefore good map reading within any group is an advantage.

Coast To Coast Cycling Route

On average a moderately fit person will complete the coast to coast cycling route in three days of cycling, which is enough to be a challenge and can be completed in a long weekend. If on the other hand you have more time it is a great way to enjoy the unspoilt villages and hamlets you will pass through on your route.

For those who enjoy mountain biking there are additional routes you could take in for great off-road riding.

Should you wish for some additional support there are companies who will assist you or your group and this can be very helpful for health and safety reasons, not withstanding puncture repairs, directions and any other problems that may arise.

Coast to coast cycling is great fun so enjoy and if you have any great experiences please send them in to me.

Pooley Bridge Walks

Pooley Bridge Walks

The Dacre Bears

Pooley Bridge Walks

Lunch And Just Desert.

There are many circular and triangular walks in the world although not as many which are short, yet long enough to work up an appetite, and with such excellent all round benefits as the one I am about to tell you of.

This particular Pooley Bridge walks I have called Lunch and Just Desert with good reason. It’s quite simple! I love my deserts and I enjoy being a little naughty as I am sure we all do? Therefore the title of this walk is a little play on words and will unfold some more as you read on.

This Pooley Bridge walks is between the Lakeland village of Dacre, which is situated not too far from Penrith and Pooley Bridge, and the stately home of Dalemain, which is open to visitors (but do check on opening times!).

There is both parking in the village hall car park of Dacre or near to the 18th Century Horse and Farrier Inn at Dacre to one end of the walk, or parking within the grounds of Dalemain at the other end of the walk.

Pooley Bridge Walks

Dacre Castle

I would suggest a good time to do this walk would be when both the above establishments are open as this definitely makes the walk more rewarding to all, including the little people.

The Pooley Bridge walks is between the historic village of Dacre and its medieval Church and peel tower type castle and Dalemain. Depending on your view point one can start from which ever end you desire although I would recommend parking at Dalemain and commencing the walk from there.

Once parked up at Dalemain in the visitors parking you will see towards the right of a stone building is a road with cattle grid and this you need to aim for and follow the road towards the courtyard of Dalemain. Keeping to your right you will pass an old gamekeepers lodge on your right as the road opens up into the courtyard.

Pooley Bridge Walks

The Village Green

Pooley Bridge Walks

To the right there is visible a stonewall of maybe 10 feet in height and I might suggest this to be possibly a walled garden on the other side. Following the tall stonewall and keeping it to your left follows the single-track all the way towards Dacre.

This is then a very simple walk with just a few gentle slopes of very little incline and I would say it is a good walk for all and of all ages. No great skill is needed in following the track road as it just opens out in front of you.

There are sheep about in the fields so keeping dogs on a lead is advisable.

Once you get near to the end of the pathway keep an eye to your left for the Peel tower castle of Dacre, which has a history all of its own. As you pass the tower on your left if you look to your right you should see St Andrews Church and believe it or not; Dacre has had a church for over a 1,000 years !

Pooley Bridge Walks

Within the grounds of the Church you can see the old and famous Dacre Bears and you may visit this website link to find out more; http://www.visitcumbria.com/pen/chp1.htm or

http://www.english-lakes.com/dacre.htm

The church is well worth a visit.

Keeping to the path and passing the tower you will come to a T junction and if you turn right you will see a short distance in front of you the old 18th Century Inn, the Horse and Farrier.

Pooley Bridge Walks

18th Century Horse And Farrier, Dacre

On entering the public house I would recommend if you get your timing just right that this would be a grand time for a spot of Lunch after a brisk walk from Dalemain. For a reasonable price I would go for lunch here and a sample of the cask ales, obviously just going for the main course.

All good reasoning would then justify after all this exercise and precision timing that it would be possible to make it all the way back to the exquisite old tea room at Dalemain for Just Desert and coffee !!

What more can one ask of a good walk? Fresh air, exercise, beautiful Lakeland scenery and wholesome food to boot!!

This is a great Pooley Bridge walks and being a circular route is great for parking your car any where upon the route.