Kings How and The Bowder Stone

Kings How and The Bowder Stone

Kings How and The Bowder Stone

Kings How and the Bowder Stone Walk Borrowdale

This is a pretty little walk fit for a king. Kings How is not particularly strenuous or demanding but a pleasant interlude if you have a couple of hours to spare.

We parked at the National Trust car park on the B5289 on the left as you come from Keswick, just past the village of Grange on the right and opposite Holmcrag wood. Kings How Grid reference: NY 253168 .We paid for 3 hours which was ample and cost just over £5.

Kings How Car Park

We turned left out of the car park along the road and almost immediately there is a National Trust sign indicating the Bowder Stone to the left. There is a clear track leading to the stone.

The stone is about 30 foot high and 50 feet across. It weighs around 2000 tons and is remarkable as it balances on one corner. As the rock is not local it is thought most likely that it landed here in the ice age carried from Scotland by the glaciers.

The rock is popular with climbers and is also accessible to most by a sturdy wooden ladder that takes one to the top. Once up there you find yourself on a fairly narrow ledge looking across to the woods.

It is a pleasant distraction in the clearing surrounded by woodland and in March the daffodils were out making it picture postcard pretty.

Continueing our Kings How walk from the Bowder stone it is an incessant if not steep climb up to King’s How. It was mid/late March when we went and the stubble of last year’s bracken studs the hillside along with the odd fallen and stripped branch. It is easy to imagine the ferns that must upholster the hillside as you walk through it in the spring and summer. As you near the peak if you look behind you there in contrast to the more autumnal colours of the fell the village of Grange surrounded by its lush green fields appears like an emerald cut in a diamond shape.

Kings How Borrowdale

As you turn a corner and just below the summit you happen upon a plaque with some indistinct lettering which has inscribed: “In Loving Memory of King Edward VII, Grange Fell is dedicated by his sister Louise as a sanctuary of rest and peace. Here may all beings gather strength, find in scenes of beautiful nature a cause for gratitude and love to God, giving them courage and vigour to carry on his will.

Princess Louise was the daughter of Queen Victoria and sister of King Edward V11. As the president of the National Trust at the time she made Grange Fell a memorial to her brother at the time of his death in 1910.

If Grange was an emerald, then by now if you look to your left Watendath Tarn is every bit a light blue sapphire glinting in the spring sunlight.

Having reached the summit from which can be seen beautiful views over Grange, Derwent Water and Keswick with Borrowdale Valley, Scafell and Great Gable to to the South we make our way back down the other side by the distinctive track which eventually leads us straight back to the car park.

Kings How and the Bowder stone is a jewel of a hike in the crown of Lakeland walks.

Derwent Water

Derwent Water Viewed From My Cat Bells Walk

Derwent Water Viewed From My Cat Bells Walk

Derwent Water Keswick

Derwent Water is one of the smaller Lakeland lakes, whilst being set within one of the most beautiful valleys of the Lake District as the lake occupies part of Borrowdale and is immediately south of Keswick. Derwentwater is surrounded by some stunning scenery and the very popular fells and walks such as Skiddaw and Cat Bells walk.

Derwent water measures approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) long by 1 mile (2.6 km) wide and is some 72 feet (22 m) deep, with several islands within the lake, one of which is inhabited, and that being Derwent Island House, an 18th century residence, which has a National Trust property and has a tenant, although open to the public on five days each year.

Derwent Water is fed by the river Derwent from the catchment area in the high fells at the head of Borrowdale. The lake is very beautiful to take pictures of with absolute calm in the early mornings and a mirror effect of the fells upon the water, and often times at dawn the fells will be a stunning red colour as the sun rises, with swirls of mist upon the water, although you can find waves splashing against Friar’s Crag when driven by a southerly Gale.

Derwent Water Launch

Derwent Water has a regular passenger launch operating upon the lake, taking passengers between various landing stages. There are seven lakeside marinas, the most popular stops being, Keswick boat landing, Portinscale and the Ladore Falls. Should you stay upon the launch as it makes it way around the lake to enjoy this journey, it will take approximately 50 minutes round trip.

There is very little car parking around the Ladore Falls so taking the Derwent Water launch is a great way to see the lake and also incorporate this in to seeing the Ladore Falls, although this is best done after rain for a more stunning scene.

The most popular way to enjoy the beauty of Derwent Water, whilst visiting the Keswick area is by walking the shores and footpaths around the lake, or sit upon a bench and watch the toing’s and throwing’s of the launch at the Theatre in the Park jetty and the Lakeside Car Park which is a pay and display, as always.

Should you wish to get upon the water under your own steam you can hire rowing boats, and motors boats. Derwent Water is a peaceful place for the family, whether picnicking, fishing, swimming or simply walking.

Should you be looking for a Lakes walk I can personally recommend using the Derwent Water launch, embarking from Lakeside car park jetty and disembarking at Hawes End, to then walk one of the classic Lakeland fell walks of Cat Bells walk which I completed recently as was rewarded with some of these great pictures of Derwent Water. The footpaths around the lake follow the banks through some extremely attractive woodland offering truly spectacular views, which makes Derwent Water on of the most popular Lakeland areas for walkers.

Much of the surrounding land is now the property of the National Trust, the lake itself was one of the Trust’s earliest acquisitions. The nearby Scarfell Pike was donated to the trust in memory of the men of Cumbria who gave their lives in the First World War.

For accommodation there is the 220 year old Barrow House Lake District Hostel which is an old mansion and ideally situated for a relaxing family or group break. Boasting extensive grounds with a large play area and woodlands, children will find plenty of space in which to enjoy. To book a hostel or hotel please look at our hotel and hostels pages. Whilst Keswick offers a multitude of Bed and Breakfast facilities.

Should you wish to see better quality photographs of Derwent Water please visit Derwent Water on our Lake District Walks Flickr account.

Please feel free to comment on this Derwent Water, share or even hit the Face Book like button.

Lake District Walks Derwent Water Video

There is an abundance of holiday accommodation within the Derwent Water and Keswick area with Campsites near Castlerigg Stone Circle, Keswick Guest Houses and local pubs. For a pet friendly home search our Lake District Cottages for a local cottage close to Penrith and the Eden Valley. Whatever time of year you visit Keswick and Derwent Water you will find a friendly place to stay.

I trust you enjoyed my article on Derwent Water.